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WHAT IS A CLINICAL TRIAL?

A clinical trial protocol is designed to protect participant’s health and well-being while answering very specific research questions.  Study subjects receive more medical supervision and testing than an average patient would for the same medical condition.

The Clinical Research Unit conducts clinical trials in all phases I-IV for patients with a neurological disease.

A treatment is given to a small group of participants to evaluate the most frequent and serious side effects and to study different dosages of the treatment. These trials often involve participants
that are healthy.

A treatment is given to a larger group of people to establish efficacy and continue evaluating safety. Participants in these clinical trials are often randomly chosen to receive either the experimental treatment or standard of care/placebo.

A treatment is given to a very large number of participants to confirm the efficacy of study drug. Participants in these clinical trials are often randomly chosen to receive either the experimental treatment or standard of care/placebo.

When a treatment is widely available, these clinical studies will evaluate the risks and advantages of using the treatment or device over a long period of time.

What can I do to help?

Consider volunteering either as a healthy volunteer or as a participant who has a particular disease or condition. Contact the CRU at info-CRU.neuro@mcgill.ca

For more information on clinical trials: www.clinicaltrials.gov